Friday, 3 January 2014

R.I.P.ie



Have you seen or are you aware there is an Irish on-line up to date death notice website? This wonderful informative website is a wealth of knowledge, where you can find all you need on one site. 
They cover the following: 



Death is not something we wish to think or consider when we are busy with our lives, but we all know that day will come to us all. Being prepared and informed is vitally important and will help making the right decisions in any circumstances. Below is some practical information to get you started should you need information to prepare. Follow through to R.I.P.ie to the practical information section for more details. 

Before a death

Making a will

What is a will? The practical steps involved in making a will and what happens when someone dies without having made a will.


Power of Attorney

Power of Attorney is a legal device in Ireland that can be set up by a person (the Donor) during his/her life to allow another specially appointed person (the Attorney) take action if the Donor is absent or becomes incapacitated.


Legal Arrangements for Incapacity

The various legal arrangements which a person can make for looking after his/her affairs if he/she is unable to do so, for whatever reason.


Advance Care Directives

An advance care directive in Ireland is a statement about the type and extent of medical or surgical treatment you want in the future, on the assumption that you will not be able to make that decision at the relevant time.
 


Source: www.citizensinformation.ie


Checklist - My Possessions

Putting your affairs in order is vital to help those who are left behind when you die.
A will is a witnessed document that sets out in writing the deceased's wishes for his or her possessions, (called his or her 'estate'), after death.

Reasons for making a will


It is important for you to make a will because if you do not, and die without a will, the law on intestacy decides what happens to your property. A will can ensure that proper arrangements are made for your dependants and that your property is distributed in the way you wish after you die, subject to certain rights of spouses/civil partners and children.

Checklist of where your possessions are kept:


It is also advisable to complete and keep updated a list of your assets. You can use a form such as that produced by the Citizens Information Board, which I have made available to download below.
It will make it easier to identify and trace your assets after you die. You should keep the list in a safe place.


Source: www.citizensinformation.ie

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